Webb, Alabama
Veterans
                                                                                                  Biography

Julian M. (Maurice) Newton was born in Webb, Alabama in 1924. He was the son of Cecil and Bessie Webb Newton. Maurice grew up in Webb, Alabama and graduated from Houston County High School in approximately 1942, or 1943. He enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps on May 13, 1943 at Fort McClellan, Alabama. After his initial training, Maurice attended flight gunner school at Laredo, Texas where he received his wings. He then traveled to Davis Monthan Field at Tucson, Arizona where attended advanced training was assigned to the crew of a B-24 Liberator (Bomber) as First Engineer. While at Davis Monthan, Maurice wrote a letter to his family in Webb on May 19, 1994 stating, in part, I am First Engineer on a B-24 Liberator. I have a First Lieutenant for a pilot. The crew is from all over the United States. The Pilot and Co-Pilot are from California, the Bombardier from Oklahoma, Radio Man, Pennsylvania, Armor from Iowa, and Second Engineer from Michigan. One of the gunners is from New York, and another from New Jersey. We haven,t seen the Navigator yet, we pick him up in a few weeks.Staff Sergeant Newton and the rest of the crew trained for several weeks at Davis Monthan and then departed for assignment to the 727th Bomb Squadron, 451st Bomb Group, 15th Air Force at Castellucio, Italy. After arriving in Italy, Staff Sergeant Newton, and his crew flew more than 120 air combat missions destroying German targets. Their final mission came on October 13, 1944 when the crew took off in Aircraft #42-51564, Fickle Finger, laden with bombs. The aircraft flew to its target over Vienna, Austria. As the aircraft arrived on station, it sustained a direct hit from German flak batteries. The aircraft literally exploded in the sky and all personnel were lost. Years later, Staff Sergeant Newton's remains were reportedly located in a small cemetery in France. 

The remains were subsequently recovered and returned to the family back in Webb, Alabama. Maurice was buried in the Webb Cemetery. May God bless you my wonderful cousin, and brave American.BiographyJulian M. (Maurice) Newton was born in Webb, Alabama in 1924. He was the son of Cecil and Bessie Webb Newton. Maurice grew up in Webb, Alabama and graduated from Houston County High School in approximately 1942, or 1943. He enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps on May 13, 1943 at Fort McClellan, Alabama. After his initial training, Maurice attended flight gunner school at Laredo, Texas where he received his wings. He then traveled to Davis Monthan Field at Tucson, Arizona where attended advanced training was assigned to the crew of a B-24 Liberator (Bomber) as First Engineer. While at Davis Monthan, Maurice wrote a letter to his family in Webb on May 19, 1994 stating, in part, I am First Engineer on a B-24 Liberator. I have a First Lieutenant for a pilot. The crew is from all over the United States. The Pilot and Co-Pilot are from California, the Bombardier from Oklahoma, Radio Man, Pennsylvania, Armor from Iowa, and Second Engineer from Michigan. One of the gunners is from New York, and another from New Jersey. We haven't seen the Navigator yet, we pick him up in a few weeks.Staff Sergeant Newton and the rest of the crew trained for several weeks at Davis Monthan and then departed for assignment to the 727th Bomb Squadron, 451st Bomb Group, 15th Air Force at Castellucio, Italy. After arriving in Italy, Staff Sergeant Newton, and his crew flew more than 120 air combat missions destroying German targets. 

Their final mission came on October 13, 1944 when the crew took off in Aircraft #42-51564, Fickle Finger, laden with bombs. The aircraft flew to its target over Vienna, Austria. As the aircraft arrived on station, it sustained a direct hit from German flak batteries. The aircraft literally exploded in the sky and all personnel were lost. Years later, Staff Sergeant Newton's remains were reportedly located in a small cemetery in France. The remains were subsequently recovered and returned to the family back in Webb, Alabama. Maurice was buried in the Webb Cemetery. May God bless you my wonderful cousin, and brave American.
                                                                                             Biography


Donald Dawson Burnham was born April 20, 1940 at Webb, Alabama. He was the son of a prominent farmer in Webb by the name of O.O. Burnham,  I recall Dawson Burnham because he was two years ahead of me in school. He attended Webb School, and graduated from Houston County High School in 1960. Dawson was well-liked in the community. I lost contact with him in 1962, but Dawson most likely left Webb, Alabama to attend college and subsequent enlistment in the U.S. Army. Dawson as a commissioned officer.Dawson later attended pilot training and was reassigned to B Troop, 1st. Squad, 9th Cavalry Division in South Vietnam. U.S. Government sources indicated that on February 2, 1968 Captain Donald D. Burnham departed Camp Evans, Quang Tri Province, South Vietnam as the pilot of a Bell, UH1H Huey helicopter, Aircraft # 66-16442 with four other personnel aboard. Their destination that day was the large U. S. Military air base at Da Nang, South Vietnam. Later, while executing a ground radar-controlled approach (GCA) to Da Nang, the controller lost voice and radar contact with Captain Burnham's aircraft. The last known position of the aircraft was 12 miles north of Da Nang, and less than one mile east of the coastline on a small finger of land that jutted out into the Gulf of Tonkin. After several attempts to contact the aircraft without success, a ground search was initiated without the aircraft being located. Some days later, on May 28, 1968, a detailed search of the area resulted in the discovery of the burned out remains of a Huey helicopter, believed to be Aircraft Tail Number 6442. Some human bone fragments were located, and a dog tag with the name of one of Captain Burnham's passengers. 

No other physical evidence was found and the fate of Captain Burnham and the other personnel could not be determined.If memory serves me correctly, Dawson Burnham was later listed as Killed In Action (KIA), Body Not Recovered (BNR. As additional information is obtained this biography will be updated. Meanwhile, may God Bless you, and may you rest in Peace, Donald Dawson Burnham. We miss you.Note: There is a head stone for Donald Dawson Burnham at the Webb Cemetery.
Julian M. Newton
B-24 Liberator

Aircraft 42-51564  Fickle Finger
Lt. Col. Donald D. Dawson
UH-1 Huey
B-Troop, 9th Calvary, U.S. Army
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